Female Athletes in an Australian Setting

Australian Rules Football, (AFL) a game which has been played for over one hundred years in Australia. Born out of Melbourne in the late 1850’s. John Northey, of Swooper Coach suggests that today’s game is controlled by the corporate dollar, with the 18 team strong league, many clubs fight to increase profits. It allows participation at all levels able to be played by all levels of physicality, children both male and female, as young as six right through to veterans playing a modified game called Super Rules. AFL Community Club, 2017 says that AFL is becoming the sport of choice for diverse communities, and is one of the most multicultural in terms of participation levels, that the Australian sporting landscape offers.  It was also reported by AFL Community Club, that up to 25% of current AFL lists are from diverse backgrounds (11% Indigenous Australians and 14% Multicultural Australians). There are programs which are also enabling young talent identification and giving more opportunities to future players.

When analysing AFL and the introduction of the Women’s League, for the first time in history this 2016/2017 season, it’s important to be mindful that AFL need to keep pushing for equality and have the support behind it. As long as the women are playing the same game, they deserve the right to be paid equally. This was compared to Australian Surfing and then compared to Track and Field’s place in Australia. The following resonates across all three sports in Australian society, that females are being represented as a ‘Female Athlete’ rather than simply ‘Athlete,’ like their male counterparts.

Firstly, analysing Australian Rules football,(AFL) and exploring current topics with the introduction of the Women’s league reveals that the AFL has a large pay gap between men and women professional AFL players. But Is the sport really doing enough to bridge that gap so women unlike men, must work alongside their professional football career in order to make a living? Recently ABC online provided statistics showing that female players are being paid 125 times less than their male counterparts. It was also made apparent in the AFLW’s annual report that an entire women’s AFL team cost less that an individual average male player.

To gain an insight, AFL mega fan Clare, was interviewed. She has this to say on the issue: ‘’ With it being such a massive thing firstly, to the women in the AFL league, I think they’re doing a fantastic job this season, with the introduction of women. However, there’s still a long way to go for women to have the same opportunities as men do.’’

With so much exposure and fans barracking for their favourite teams, it would make sense that football would be a full-time job for the female athletes, like the men? Think again. The top two players of each team will get about $25,000 for the season, and then $10,000 for high profile players, and $5,000 for everyone else, for an eight-week season. All are expected to train about nine hours per week, plus pre-season. This seems incompatible with an average male player who earns just over $300,000 (ABC.net). This essentially equates to buying an entire women’s team for the cost of a single male player.

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www.instagram.com/erinphillips131 Premiership winner, Best and Fairest and mother to twins. Also plays professional basketball for Australia. But would need a second job to supplement her family if playing AFL alone.

Clare voiced her concerns on this topic by saying, ‘’As a mother of a daughter, I am very excited by the fact that women’s league has been introduced. And by the time she’s old enough, hopefully those years would have provided enough time for it to have developed and become an equal opportunity. ‘’ The problem seems to lie with broadcasting rights to women’s matches, as that’s where the big money lies. It would be expected to take a few years before the broadcasters would pay rights to show women’s footy matches, according to AFL’s general manager of game and market development, Simon Lethlean.

As long as the women are paying the same game, they deserve the rights to be paid equally. Below is what the public had to say:

AFL Fb Poll

AFLTwitter Poll

When it comes to professional female surfers in Australia, there is also a divide between males and females. This begs the question, why are female athletes valued less than their male counterparts? ‘’Viewership,’’ says Scott Atheron, Surf Coach, Manly Surf School, in my group member Andrea Kovszun’s Story entitled: Sex Sells: How Female surf athletes are using social media. ‘’The value in women’s surfing comes from their lifestyle factor, I feel like they are forced to go into bikinis and lifestyle campaigns to subsidies their value as surfers.’’It’s no secret that millennials take social media very seriously. But nowadays professional athletes have a duty of care in the way they promote themselves via social media.

ELLIE

www.instagram.com/elliejeancoffey – Face of Billabong and Roxy Australia, but not in the top 100 surfers in the world.

Athletes use platforms such as Instagram or Facebook to boost their image and share their stories, making them more attractive to brands, sponsors and viewers. Andy makes a great note in her piece by going on to say ‘’We are left with the issue , in this social media, millennial world, if women want to cover that gap, they must be perceived, first and foremost, as athletes and not as Instagram models.’’ If sexuality is the main qualifier for popularity in women’s professional sport, rather than their physical achievements and performance it will never be seen for what it is, a professional sport.

This doesn’t apply to surfing alone. When reviewing male and female track athletes there seems to be also a notable discrepancy. The current fastest women in the world, is Shelly-Anne Fraser-Pryce of Jamaica. After winning an Olympic Games in 2012 and being the current reigning world 100m champion. For her world title race, she was reportedly paid US$60,000. In comparison to Usain Bolt, undoubtedly the world’s most successful sprinter and is number 32 on Forbes Highest-Paid Athletes list. For the same race, at the same championships as Fraser-Pryce, Bolt was paid an astounding US $120,000.

This is what the public has to say:

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When discussing these surprising facts, with Track and Field guru Mike Hurst, who was a former Daily Telegraph journalist and coach of 1988 400m Mens and Womens Olympic Finalists as well as the current second fastest man in Australia, over 400m, had this to say on the issue of pay equality in Track and Field: ‘’Shelly-Ann Fraser pryce clearly hasn’t spoken up enough. I’m surprised, I thought there was parity in the IAAF World Championships.I think people need to have a voice, I don’t think track and field athletes have a voice.’’

Mike firstly gave his insight on how females are compared to male athletes in Australia by saying: ‘’Are they recognised as being great athletes in their own right? Or are they being forced to portray themselves in bikinis or whatever? I think in Australia track and field athletes are very well respected. I think popularity will come with performance. But there are some people who just don’t resonate with the media. They don’t resonate with the public.’’ To change this and move forward, Mike offered the insight that if women support their own processes, and own campaigners, they will have  a much more powerful lobby, and will be able to achieve much more, like they should do in comparison to their male counterparts at the same level of competitive sport.

Just like Australian surfing, it’s been notable that Australian female track and field athletes feel the pressure that they need to over-sexualise themselves on social media, to be more attainable to potential sponsors. ‘’Followers,’’ and ‘’Likes,’’ has progressively become a trend for these women and a point of conversation, to make them feel esteemed over their competitors. This has nothing to do with performance and does not make sense.  Mike also discussed this issue and whether men have this same pressure, by saying: ‘’I think it works both ways, but not in the way the women do.’’

Moving forward, in order for women to seek equality he said, ‘’There should be a professional athletes association, for Track and Field. There should be one for all sports. And there should be one for Olympians overall. He suggests it’s the athletes and the sports that have got their act together, through strong leadership and not just winging or bullying, that the future is bright for them.He commented on the new structure of the women’s Suncorp Super Netball league. ‘’I think what netball has done is fantastic. However the problem is, you put the product out there, it is not a seller’s market, it is a buyers market. If the public buy the men and not the women, the people who organize the women’s game need to have a very strong look at why it is not being marketed correctly, promoted correctly – the media presence may not be strong enough. They need to do something about it. ‘’

That is the expert opinion. In order for women’s sports, in an Australian male dominated sports society it is important that the athletes keep rallying for change and don’t remain complacent on important issues and seeking quality. They deserve to be seen as professional athletes and not just ‘’female Athletes,’’ as women at the top of their game.

 

The Black Dog.

Mental Health. A stigma in Australian society, because we were brought up to believe showing emotion or being deemed as vulnerable is somewhat what ‘weak.’ 

What ‘weak’ is, truthfully. Is not being ‘real.’

Real with your loved ones. Your acquainted, sometimes. But most of all ‘real’ with yourself.

Now, it’s my time to be brutally real with you. I feel extremely vulnerable sharing this with the world. But in the Hope of bringing  a hope to someone who is going through something, similarly. Here goes. You are not alone. 

Although I’ve been infamously known as the happy-go-lucky, always smiling optimistic girl. I’ve suffered bouts of clinical depression for many years of my life, and counting. But it hasn’t, not will it ever. Win. 

It stemmed from a childhood of having a pre-conceived notion of myself, of having to be ‘perfect.’ 

Perfectionism. Literally myself as my own worst enemy. Perfect in everything. From school work. To my career as an athlete and my sporting life. I even Tried to attain what I thought perfection was, in things I could never control, like physical looks

But To what? A materliatic image society has pre-convinced you to believe as sometime you must attain toward. To be successful in life? To be happy?

Ridiculous. 

Now that, is not real. It’s only even lead to feeling like I’ve let myself down. And then in turn my parents, My family or my friends. A feeling of defeat. Because I was trying to live up to the impossible. A standard so high, it didn’t even exist.

How do you tell that little girl, with the world at her feet that – she’s good enough. When she doesn’t believe she ever will be, Because her own mind is the enemy? 

It has its bouts. Sometimes I’m up and forget about it all together. And sometimes I’m down. And I forget about Hope all together.

 I have fought some demons. And continue to. Like we all do. Everyday. But, then when all is said and done. When my serotonin levels are stable. When the world is being kind to me. And I feel truly happy. I think, wow! Maybe I’ve beaten it once and for all, this time! 

That Dog, Comes back and bites again.

It only takes a small thing, like an injury. A family crisis. An episode of challenging self-doubt to make the Big Black Dog, resurface its destruction on my mind, once again. A battle between reality and perfection. Because scientifically my brain no longer produces enough serotonin levels in order keep my mood stable. 

But I have learned to know my limits. To know the warning signs. And then to be kind to myself

And breathe.

I have strategies. I take a self-care day. I go to the beach, which reminds me of home. I feel Safe there. Alone but not lonely. I get lost in the waves and enjoy the sun. And the sand between my toes. Getting lost in the beauty of creation. In the wilderness. On adventures that distance myself from civilisation. 

Or I listen to music and dance, freely. Expressing myself through the melody; unaware of my surrounding. Or Sometimes I just cry. Let the salt of my tears, wash away those bad feelings. Until I can’t cry anymore.

Sometimes I lift. Something heavy. Real heavy. Deadlifts, Preferably. But mostly I run. Around a track. As fast as my body will take me. With every ounce I my being, every muscle I can contract and every breath I have pumping through my lungs. 

But I am blessed. I am continually Reminded, I’m never alone  amongst this sadness. I have God. Who doesn’t want this for me and my life. And I am reminded to have faith in His plans for my future.

I have my family. Who are my biggest unconditional support. Through the highs and the lows. And The Journey. Alongside my partner. Who won’t let me be anything but real with him. And he pushes me, to push myself. To better myself. 

And I have my strength. That always pulls through. That’s unrelenting and stubborn. That will ultimately, help me win this battle. 

But I’ve learned I can only beat this, once and for all – by being real with myself. 100% down.

None of this hiding behind a mask, pretending it’s all okay. Smiling happily, unbewildered to those around me, I’m suffering in silence of a ‘crawl-in-a-ball’ crippling sadness. The kind that that comes back to bite me at the worst possible times of my life. 

It’s about breathing. Relying on myself for healing. Not anyone else. Not any doctors or medication, that I’ve been spoon-fed for years on end.

It’s going to take the deep, wild, unexplored depths of my soul. To fight this. And I really want to fight it. More than anything.

To no longer feel wanting-to-sleep-all-the-time ”tired for no reason.’ Sometimes bouts of emotions that can’t be held in at the most inconveniant times. Like during a university lecture. Or on the train ride home. Or a social event, where the pressure to be ‘perfect‘ and to impress. Becomes all too much. 

And Dog, ol’ pal. I’m done with you. Oh, I am done!

Life isn’t an instagram filter. Or happily airbrushed like it seems on social media. People go through things. Through pain, trials and tribulations, everyday. And that’s part of being tested. Building resilience. Making you grounded. Making you feel.  

But it’s important to also reach out to those who need a shoulder. Please be a listener. Someone next to you might be suffering and you don’t even know it! Create a safe space of sharing and support other humans. It is all too important in our destructive world. Let someone know it’s okay not to be fully okay. And to show the world that. 

One day, I will be free. Free from all of this, bullshit. I will fight this. Because I’m worth it. Because even when there feels like there’s no more hope left. Other people will always have a hope in me. And I have hope in you, too. 

 Never give up on yourself. Even when it seems like the world around you has. You are worth more, than you could ever imagine. 

And someone, somewhere. Is thinking of you. And values you. Without you even realising. 

You got this

Can you promote yourself as a female athlete without selling yourself?

It’s no secret that millennials take social media very seriously. But nowadays professional athletes have a duty of care in the way they promote themselves via social media.
Athletes use platforms such as Instagram or Facebook to boost their image and share their stories, making them more attractive to brands, sponsors and viewers; not to mention bringing in extra dollars and credibility into the world of athletics along the way. Some athletes choose to do this with humility while others choose to use their physical appearance to attract an audience, rather than their athletic ability.
At the recent Drug Aware Margaret River Pro, Hawaiian John Florence won a prize of USD$100,000. This came after Sally Fitzgibbons earned her 1st place winnings of USD$60,000 the day before. Both athletes surfed the same break, within the same conditions, at the same time. The discrepancies do not stop there. According to the most current Forbes The World’s Highest-Paid Athletes List the top 39 paid athletes in the world, are ALL men. With Serena Williams being the only female athlete in the top 87 of the list, coming in at #40.
Does this infuriate yourself, like it does the women reading this discovery? This begs the question: Why are female athletes less valued then their male counterparts? In almost every professional sport. Sexualisation, plays a big part.
Some women may feel the pressure because they are not receiving equal pay to men in the same sport. This can result in no longer viewing athletic achievement as a priority and distorts the perception of the female athlete, who then may choose then to use their appearance to gain social media presence and become more influential. This in turn allows them to earn more in endorsements and sponsorships, than relying on their performance in their chosen field.

Comparing social media statistics between the current #1 and 5-time world champion Stephanie Gilmore’s 466K Instagram followers, Alana Blanchard’s impressive 1.8 million followers, and Ellie Jean Coffee’s strong 784k followers. Why does Blanchard and Coffee’s popularity far exceed Gilmore’s? Maybe because the two are notorious for their faces seen in every Rip Curl or Billabong campaign (respectively) as well as their Instagram filled with selfies in glamorous, tropical locations. Yet neither compete on the WSL tour, placing a long way past 100th in the rankings, or are nearly as athletically gifted as Gilmore. A quick scroll through their feeds and you’ll notice a big difference, in comparing the current world champion, who’s feed showcases videos of her recent tubes and training sessions, the others choose to showcase the latest bikinis, captured at a strategic angle.

www.instagram.com/stephaniegilmore

 

www.instagram.com/elliejeancoffey

“Some girls are definitely self-sexualizing, they know what the market is and what gets the best response. In the culture of surfing, sex sells. They’re making a lot of money out of it.” Scott Atheron, Surf Coach, Manly Surf School.

This doesn’t apply to surfing alone. The current fastest women in the world, is Shelly-Anne Fraser-Pryce of Jamaica. After winning an Olympic Games in 2012 and being the current reigning world 100m champion, you think she would be a household name? With only 211k Instagram followers to her name, the world’s fastest female was paid US$60,000 for her world title win in 2015. In comparison to Mr Usain Bolt, undoubtedly the world most successful sprinter and known to almost all people who own a television, around the world. He attains 6.7Million Instagram followers, is number 32 on Forbes Highest-Paid Athletes list and for the same race, at the same championships was paid US -$120,000 for his 2015 World Title, in comparison to Shelly-Ann’s $60K.

This necessity for over exposure, it seems, is growing the gap for women in sport. Tim Wigmore, of NewStatemen Sport, has this to say about the matter. ‘’The roots of this discrepancy lie in the birth of modern sport, 150 years ago. Women’s treatment in sport has always been a manifestation of wider gender inequality and, as sports evolved and professionalised, became self-perpetuating. The huge funding disparity between male and female sport means that women have had fewer opportunities to play sport, have suffered from inadequate coaching and facilities compared with those enjoyed by men, and have been paid meagre sums, even for playing international sport. This has damaged the quality of sport.’’ 

 We are left with the issue , in this social media, millennial world, if women want to cover that gap, they must be perceived, first and foremost, as athletes and not as Instagram models. If sexuality is the main qualifier for popularity in women’s professional sport, then women’s sport will not be seen for what it is; a sport, rather than a glorified modelling industry.

Athletes Not ”Female Athletes”

Welcome to The Changing Game podcast! This is where five students take a closer look at the rise of women’s sport and key issues in the female sporting landscape.

In this episode Susannah Walmsley will firstly chat with our special guest Mary K from Ladies Who League. The group will look at key moments in women’s sport from the fans perspective and hear from an amazing panel of women’s sport advocates. The pannel made up of Andy Kovszun,who is Content Producer at Fitzgibbons International, Phil Wishart from the Office of Sport, Susannah Walmsley, a professional basketball player with the Sydney Uni Flames, Stacey Speer hosting the podcast, who is an American football player and works in marketing at Gridiron NSW. And myself, offering perspective an internationally ranked Heptathlete. 

My chosen focus for the podcast was the quote regarding the AFL Women’s league ”AFL need to keep pushing for equality and have the support behind them to make these talented athletes,seen as what they are. Athletes, rather than ‘’Female Athletes. As long as the women are playing the same game, they deserve the rights to be paid equally.” In final editing of the podcast, due to time restraints the team decided to focus my discussion about equal pay as a professional athlete, and athletics in Australia in comparison to USA College Athletics. Rather than the AFL discussion which was made in previous takes.

AFL – Still a Man’s Sport?

This interview explores current topics surrounding Australian rules football with the introduction of the Women’s league for the first time this season. The main research found that the AFL has a large pay gap between men and women’s professional AFL players. The ABC provided the statistics that female players are being paid 125 times less than their male counterparts. The Australian also discussed sexism in the sport. Additional research showed that there was a huge difference for New South Wales and Victorian fans, between what matches were available on free-to-air and cable television stations, as well as additional coverage on news stations, both television and radio, and in local newspapers.

Australian Rules football has had a predominately Victorian fan base within Australian society. The introduction of the Women’s league created exposure nation and world-wide in bridging the quality gap between men’s and women’s professional sports. But the question is, is the AFL really doing enough to bridge that gap so women unlike men, must work alongside their professional football career in order to make a living? Recently ABC online provided statistics showing that female players are being paid 125 times less than their male counterparts. It was also made apparent in the AFLW’s annual report that an entire women’s AFL team cost less that an individual average male player.

To gain an insight, UTS Sports Media spoke to an AFL mega fan Clare in Sydney last week. She has this to say on the issue: ‘’ With it being such a massive thing firstly, to the women in the AFL league, I think they’re doing a fantastic job this season, with the introduction of women. However, there’s still a long way to go for women to have the same opportunities as men do.’’

The Women’s league certainly gained great exposure across the shortened eight-week season, the exhibition match, won by 19 points by the Demons, reached 1.1 million viewers who watched at least five minutes across Channel 7, 7mate and Foxtel. (Footywire.com.au statistics).

With so much exposure and fans barracking for their favourite teams, it would make sense that football would be a full-time job for the female athletes, like the men? Think again. The top two players of each team will get about $25,000 for the season, and then $10,000 for high profile players, and $5,000 for everyone else. You read correctly: These elite athletes will earn merely $5,000 for an eight-week season. All are expected to train about nine hours per week, plus pre-season. This seems incomparable with an average male player who earns just over $300,000 (ABC.net). This essentially equates to buying an entire women’s team for the cost of a single male player. It just doesn’t add up.

Clare voiced her concerns on this topic by saying, ‘’As a mother of a daughter, I am very excited by the fact that women’s league has been introduced. And by the time she’s old enough, hopefully those years would have provided enough time for it to have developed and become an equal opportunity. ‘’ The problem seems to lie with broadcasting rights to women’s matches, as that’s where the big money lies. It would be expected to take a few years before the broadcasters would pay rights to show women’s footy matches, according to AFL’s general manager of game and market development, Simon Lethlean.

As long as the women are paying the same game, they deserve the rights to be paid equally.

Below is what the public had to say:

AFLTwitter Poll

AFL Fb Poll

Too Much Ego, Kills Talent

For some people, their world can revolve around, how many ‘likes’ they need to attain on social media, in order to validate their existence, or feel worthy. It could be easy to get caught up in the popularity contest. By comparing how many ‘followers’ you have, to the person next to you. Some people too, feel the need to create an idealistic life with pictures; to make themselves seem more attainable to people viewing behind a screen. This is not real life

Once upon a time, I too was so naive to get caught up in this world. And was worried about my social media life reflecting how many people liked me, in real life. Then I realised how shallow and Ridiculous this thought process, really was. You are worth much more than that. And to be honest, now that this no longer phases me – I’ve been a lot happier ever since. 

Your success in this world, depends on gracefully you move through life, how much you put in and how well you treat others. 1000 likes on a selfie, ain’t going to save you when you’re in trouble or keep you warm at night. 

I have noticed the world of Track and Field, has become very much similar in following this Trend. I love track. I always have. It’s my passion. And a huge part of my life. This will be my eighteenth season, as a competing athlete. And I’ve begun to notice these negative trends progress over the years. 

Politics, gossip and ‘followers’ – have somewhat been a closer focus and point of conversation, rather than how fast, strong, or agile someone is. Those other elements have nothing to do with performance. This doesn’t make sense. This frustrates me. 

Being an individual sport, it can become very lonely out there. No Team, backing you. Just the track. Your thoughts in your head and the hard work you’ve put in, to get you to that point. And then, this ‘Trend’ is continuing to emerge and take focal point. Where it seems people have progressively begun to judge another athlete, based on how many followers she or he has, or how their social life matches up to their fellow competitors.

I’m sorry, but that isn’t going to make you run a PB. Attain a qualifier. Or win a medal. It’s going to create a false sense of security. Make you worry about your reputation. And create an environment for yourself, that encourages popularity based majorly on looks. Rather than yourself as a human being. 

Don’t get me wrong; Social media is a wonderful tool! For sharing memories, marketing and promotion or advertising. But it should not be a platform for bullying and slander, because someone doesn’t ‘match up’ to their competitor online. Even though they might be a greater athlete on the track than them.  What has our sport become? Bullying is never okay.

I, personally have been bullied on social media, a few times over. It’s strange encounter. Having Someone hiding behind a keyboard, throwing words at you. Having someone try and bring you down, in order to make themselves look more cool, or more attainable for what ever reason. 
Having someone judge your worth, based on a picture? They don’t even know you. They don’t know how deep their words could be cutting. They don’t know your situation or the state of your mental health. They don’t know you, as a person. Yet, they attack – for personal gain? Or for a laugh? That doesn’t help anything. Or anyone. 

Your ego, is your worst enemy. This negative energy thrown around, will only ultimately come back to bite you. 

I’ve found this trend translate from behind the screen to real life, in more recent circumstances. I recently had a former bully, approach me in a social situation… and try and get some kind of gain from making a public personal attack. 

Fortunately I was mature enough, to defuse the situation. Act politely. And discontinue that encounter as quick as it started, much to their dismay. But, I do wonder – what fuelled their experience? What was their goal behind doing that? To want to personally attack me… for being me? I kinda felt sorry for them, in that moment. 

I’ve never done anything to harm this person in any way metaphorically or physically, but yet I am a target? No. I will not stand for this. I deserve to go through life, being authentically me. Free of judgement, just like the next person. Or fear of someone trying to bring me down for simply being myself. And, as does each of you, equally have that right! 

This egotism, can move into how you interact in front of people. If you surround yourself with that negative persona for long enough, it can become you. And I’ve seen it change people’s personalities, just like this individual’s. 

To say the right things in front of the screens and then slander other people behind the scenes. 

Humility

And I can only wish these people, attain enough self confidence to become humble. To realise their actions aren’t making themselves a better person, a better athlete or making the world better. It’s only bringing someone else down. 

I encourage you: Never lower yourself to your bully’s standards. Don’t follow The Trend. Negative people will find their flaws. Karma will take care of that. 
Your job it to keep doing you. Authentically you. And move through life attracting all the positive energy, you solely deserve.  

Run your race, you beauty! 

Interview and Slideshow

I decided to interview a very interesting man names Sundesh, from gym I train at following my technical glitch and got a great insight into how he firstly, migrated to Australia in search of asylum during a political coo, in Fiji during the late 1980’s in which he was a radio journalist himself.

Sundesh was captured by military and explained he was hung by the arms for three days straight, in punishment of reporting on what was going on in Fiji. He decided to flee his country, and sought help from a politician in Australia. He was able to secure residency and relocated after three months of correspondence.
Sundesh, went on to explain how he now thinks of Australia as home. And a country who provide him and his family safety, food and a sense of belonging during a time of need.
Sundesh explained he trained at the gym, we were currently at during his relocation to Sydney. But then went on to travel 127 countries in search of a story to write a book upon.

He is now 74 years old, and has found himself back at the same gym he trained at all those years ago. Vince and Roz’s gym is one of Australia’s longest running gyms, having been operating at various locations around Sydney since 1953.
Sundesh explained that having broken his back during his travels in New Zealand, physical therapy was the only thing that has made him as mobile as he is now.
He is happy to be back at his old training ground, having re-joined the gym Just two weeks ago.

This is what he had this to share with us, about his triumph over serious injury.